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rayjohnsonestate:

A Joseph Beuys bunnyhead by Ray Johnson, 1987.

rayjohnsonestate:

A Joseph Beuys bunnyhead by Ray Johnson, 1987.

2 girls in heat

2 girls in heat

Jenny Holzer’s famous truism “Protect me from what I want” renders in a very precise way the fundamental ambiguity of the hysterical position. It can either be read as an ironic reference to the standard male chauvinist wisdom that a woman, when left to herself, gets caught in the self-destructive fury, so that she must be protected from herself by the benevolent male domination: “Protect me from the excessive self-destructive desire in me that I myself am not able to dominate.” Or it can be read in a more radical way, as pointing towards the fact that in today’s patriarchal society, woman’s desire is radically alienated, that she desires what men expect her to desire, that she desires to be desired by men. In this case, “Protect me from what I want” means “What I want, precisely when I seem to formulate my authentic innermost longing, is already imposed on me by the patriarchal order that tells me what to desire, so the first condition of my liberation is that I break up the vicious cycle of my alienated desire and learn to formulate my desire in an autonomous way.”
Slavoj Žižek, How To Read Lacan  (via teacakes)

(Source: linkinparkvevo420696661337)

Anonymous asks: ur byotiful

~sunglass emoji~

imglib:

Using the Typewriter as a Lathe or Saw

imglib:

Using the Typewriter as a Lathe or Saw

so much 2 do

so much 2 do

shihlun:

Foucault’s polo neck, now on sale.

shihlun:

Foucault’s polo neck, now on sale.

Simone de Beauvoir Explains “Why I’m a Feminist” in a rare TV interview (1975)

nyctaeus:

Adrian Piper, ‘Cornered’, 1988

Cornered (1988) consists of a single video monitor which is wedged into a corner of the gallery behind an overturned table. The monitor is flanked by two birth certificates one identifying Piper’s father as white and the other as black (octoroon). Piper herself appears on the monitor, addressing viewers casually and quietly. Her own ambiguous racial identity, which confounds stereotypes due to Piper’s light skin and self–described “bourgie, junior-miss” style of dress, serves as a basis for Piper’s rigorously argued, deconstructive analysis that calls into question not only her own apparent racial identity, but the viewer’s as well.

To Piper, racial identity in biological terms is less important than what we “do about it” in social and cultural terms. Thus, after informing “white” viewers of the likelihood that, according to genetic statistics and entrenched conventions of racial classification, they are actually black, Piper presents a number of behavioural options. For example:

"Are you going to research your family ancestry, to find out whether you are among the white ‘elite’? Or whether perhaps a mistake has been made, and you and your family are, after all, among the black majority?

"And what are you going to do if a mistake has been made? Are you going to tell your friends, your colleagues, your employer that you are in fact black, not white, as everyone had supposed? Or will you try to discredit the researchers who made this estimate in the first place."

In conclusion Piper says, "If I choose to identify myself as black whereas you do not," "that’s not just a special, personal fact about me. It’s a fact about us. It’s our problem to solve."

While provoking the viewer’s awareness of his or her own role in perpetuating ideologies of racial difference, Piper reminds us that the power of such ideologies to determine a person’s identity cuts both ways. The white population’s impulse to define—and therefore separate—blackness, for instance, can be seen as an attempt to define whiteness itself by exclusion. 

the-coven:

hhobbess:

fleeten:

smashprintingpress:

Announcing the release of snapped chat, a full-color photozine of snaps. An extension of the snapped chat project. 


Featuring work by: 
Vivian Fu, Lauren Cook, Paige Steplewski, Abbie Heath, Cheyenne Sophia, Ariana Huerta, Amy Stober, Ashley Walters, Garrett Lockhart, Kelly Surdo, Cynthia Mai Ammann, Ronika Mcclain, Caroline Caswell, Emily Mason, Hobbes Ginsberg, Suzanna Zak, Liv Thurley, Van Robinson, Carlin Brown, Lindsay Bottos.

color laZer printed
32 pages
September, 2014
First edition of 28

Cover by Carlin Brown


Order it in the shop.

lots of great people in this project!

Uterine spasms, doctor’s appointments, and a cat piss mattress

Uterine spasms, doctor’s appointments, and a cat piss mattress

(Source: womans-day)